Specialisation Tracks

Graduate Institute of International Studies
Posted on:

Type

Other

 

As part of the curriculum, students choose one major from the three specialisation tracks of the Master in International Affairs (i.e. Global Security, Trade & International Finance, and Environment, Resources & Sustainability) and one minor, which can be either from one of the three specialization tracks of the Master in International Affairs or from the specialization tracks of the Master in Development Studies (i.e. Power, Conflict & Development; Mobilities, Spaces & Cities; and Environment, Resources & Sustainability), or the minor offered on Global Health.

The specialisation tracks consist of two core courses and a number of disciplinary and interdisciplinary electives specific to the track. Students must obtain 24 credits in the major and 12 credits in the minor.

 

This specialisation track offers a variety of courses that will provide students with a systemic and critical understanding of the evolution of the global security architecture, as well as the transformations shaping it at the beginning of the 21st century.

The interlocked and evolving nature of state and non-state actors – as well as international institutions – in the international system will be at the heart of the track’s core course. The broad range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary courses – offered by a mix of Graduate Institute and visiting professors – will allow students to focus on more specific issues; from regional security dynamics (e.g. in the Middle East) to the role of business in shaping the evolving security environment. The students will also gain hands-on experience via a series of applied skills workshops, simulations and hands-on trainings. The overall aim of the track is to forge a mix of theoretical and practical skills that are necessary for effective participation for future professionals faced with security policy challenges. 

 

ELECTIVE COURSES IN THE SPECIALISATION TRACK

CAPSTONE

  • Capstone, Achim Wennmann, Claudia Seymour (9 ECTS)

The interlocked and evolving nature of state and non-state actors – as well as international institutions – in the international system will be at the heart of the track’s core course. The broad range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary courses – offered by a mix of Graduate Institute and visiting professors – will allow students to focus on more specific issues; from regional security dynamics (e.g. in the Middle East) to the role of business in shaping the evolving security environment. The students will also gain hands-on experience via a series of applied skills workshops, simulations and hands-on trainings. The overall aim of the track is to forge a mix of theoretical and practical skills that are necessary for effective participation for future professionals faced with security policy challenges.

Jussi Hanhimäki

Please note that this specialization track is still being designed, and that the core course and some of the electives may still be subject to change.

This course will provide students with a systemic and critical understanding of the global security landscape, as well its transformations at the beginning of the 21st century. Students will be exposed to the political economy, and the sociology of the global security system, its history and evolution during the Cold War, and its remaking after the attacks of 11 September 2001.

The course will further touch on structural factors such as great-power dynamics, authoritarian and military regimes, state repression and security governance, as well as on emerging threats such as cyber crime, data theft, transnational criminal and terrorist networks, and the potential contagion effects of social media. The teaching will seek to impart on students a critical approach to security that emphasizes the various and cross-cutting ways in which the growing "securitization" of state and society play out at the sub-national and local levels, emphasizing factors related to individual and group agency in the context of social movements, armed non-state actors, intra-state violence, insurgencies and civil wars, and urban warfare. 

 

The Evolution of Global SecurityThe Arab-Israeli Conflict The Politics of Disruption: Making Sense of the Global Protest MovementIntroduction to International Humanitarian LawThe Politics of Commercial Security 

The Trade & International Finance track introduces students to core issues in international economic integration. Students can take a compulsory course either on Trade or International Finance. The Trade course exposes them to modern trade theory and key recent development such as the emergence of global value chains. Students will develop a critical understanding of trade policy and its enforcement at the global level.

The International Finance course introduces students to the basics of exchange rate dynamics, capital flow, balance of payments and international macroeconomic policy. Drawing on the disciplines of the Institute and the expertise of experienced policymakers, a range of electives courses will provide other perspectives on international economic integration, in particular from history and anthropology.

The course will also cover specialised topics such as international business, competition and industrial policy, Internet governance, international standard setting and the global governance of intellectual property rights. Through case-based teaching and the opportunity to develop a capstone project, students will be challenged by concrete problems.  

 

  • Globalisation, Richard Baldwin (AUTUMN 2018)

ELECTIVE COURSES IN THE SPECIALISATION TRACK

CAPSTONE

 

The International Finance course introduces students to the basics of exchange rate dynamics, capital flow, balance of payments and international macroeconomic policy. Drawing on the disciplines of the Institute and the expertise of experienced policymakers, a range of electives courses will provide other perspectives on international economic integration, in particular from history and anthropology. 

The course will also cover specialized topics such as international business, competition and industrial policy, Internet governance, international standard setting and the global governance of intellectual property rights. Through case-based teaching and the opportunity to develop a capstone project, students will be challenged by concrete problems.  

Ugo Panizza

The course covers some of the most important and controversial topics in economics. How are exchange rates determined? What are the differences between the conduct of economic policy under fixed and floating exchange rates? Is one exchange rate regime better than the other? Are trade deficits harmful? What are the drivers of international capital flows and the roots of balance of payment crises? Do countries manipulate their exchange rate, and if so why?

The course will apply economics tools to discuss real-world events such as the crisis of the euro and to evaluate potential latent vulnerabilities in the world economy. The course will mostly use graphical analysis and no mathematics beyond high-school level.

Globalization

Richard Baldwin

This course looks at how the information revolution has changed globalisation, its impact on national economies and how government should react to it. The first part takes a brief look at alternative conceptualisation of globalisation. The second part looks at the long history of globalisation. The third part presents an extension of the traditional globalisation narrative that accounts for why and how globalisation changed.

The Corporation: Historical, Ethnographic and Ethical PerspectivesMacroeconomics and International FinanceCompetition Law and EconomicsRegulating Economic Globalisation

Environmental issues are becoming more salient for international relations and are critical now in livelihood and for framing of development programmes at all scales. The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals chart this vision for international relations, but innumerable local, regional and nation state programmes structure their development strategies through environmental policies and practices.

The advancement of those visions depends critically on knowledge, cutting-edge policy development and innovation at all levels. The track offers an opportunity to focus on the emerging questions of governance, environment, resources and sustainability/resilience. As part of their specialisation students are required to take a core course of the track, which introduces them to multidisciplinary debates and concepts, related to these questions. Elective courses are organised in thematic clusters. However, students are free to choose electives either within one of the four clusters, if they are interested in developing a specific type of expertise, or across the clusters offered in the track.

 

1 COMPULSORY COURSE IN THE SPECIALISATION TRACK

ELECTIVE COURSES IN THE SPECIALISATION TRACK

Cluster: The Global Framework

 

 

Cluster: Resources, Economics, Governance and Politics

 

 

  • Capstone, Marc Hufty, Claire Somerville (9 ECTS)

The advancement of those visions depends critically on knowledge, cutting-edge policy development and innovation at all levels. The track offers an opportunity to focus on the emerging questions of governance, environment, resources and sustainability/resilience. As part of their specialization they are required to take the core course to the track, which introduces them to multidisciplinary debates and concepts, related to these questions. The additional three and six-credit courses (or equivalent) can be taken either within one of the four specialized areas, if students are interested to develop a specific type of expertise, or across the courses offered in the curriculum track.

The Global FrameworkThe first sub-pillar looks at the environmental issues from the global optic reviewing the institutions, legal frameworks, multilevel and multilateral forms of governance, and how these shape both the realm of international relations as well as on ground transformations and political ecologies. Given the increasing salience of international agreements and even subnational international jurisdictional practices, this part of the track might usefully be thought of as the more IR inflected part of the curriculum, but one which maintains a strong connection to field outcomes.Climate ChangeThis sub-pillar focuses on questions of Climate Change in light of the planetary history and current responses to these changes through mitigation, abatement, adaptation and increasingly, even the role of forests in “negative” emissions.” Consumption patterns, technological change, social reorganization, rural development, urban patterns, climate justice and climate refugees are all part of this topic area. This section provides insights into the historical processes as well as the global array of legal, economic political and social responses that now confront modern societies challenged with the increasingly difficult problem of holding global temperatures below projected tipping points. The politics of energy, dynamics of populations, forms of innovation and the dynamics of the living planet itself inform this sub track. Resources, Economics, Governance and PoliticsThis sub-pillar addresses the intersection of the politics and economics of resources, access and development, how economies structure their uses and their conflicts. Mining and hydrocarbon development, water resources, biotic resources, land politics of many kinds underpin both highly successful resource based development and unfortunately, many failed states. Larger questions of changing efficiencies, emergent resources and technology and what social configurations evolve for managing complex systems while maintain their longer term ecological social and physical viability underpins this field.Agrarian Environments and Food SystemsAgrarian Environments and food systems are central drivers of land use change and potentially land use recuperation. About half the world population still remains agrarian to some degree, it remains a considerable sources of rural employment, as well as important sites of meaning and identity. Currently rural areas and their forms of farming are locations of extraordinary social, ecological and political transformation, conflict, land grabbing, and new globalized production technologies and markets. Such systems are both drivers and victims climate change which enhances the vulnerabilities of both traditional and modern agricultural systems. This sub-pillar takes on the agrarian and agriculture from its historical roots to its current problematics.

Governance of Environment & Sustainability

Liliana Andonova

Environmental issues lie at the heart of modern development and international politics and have produced many novel institutions, practices and new kinds of negotiations. This gateway course provides an overview of topics in this critical analytical, research and practice arena. It has three primary objectives.

The first is to introduce major environmental issues such as climate change, water, land use and resource trends and politics and to examine the various dimensions along which they modify international affairs local development politics and the problematics of development paths.

The second and central objective is to engage multiple disciplinary perspectives on the governance and outcomes of these global dynamics that straddle conventional boundaries between natural, societal and economic systems.

Third, students will gain understanding of and engage in debates surrounding environmental change and decision-making for sustainability, adaptation and resilience. This objective is pursued through the lectures of Graduate Institute faculty from several disciplines (such as history, law, sociology, economics and international politics), through policy debates, and through opportunities to engage with organizations and ideas from the policy world of International Geneva. The course provides the foundation for students do take advanced seminars in the track Environment, Resources, and Sustainability.

>The Global FrameworkConservation and Sustainable DevelopmentSocial Movements and the EnvironmentGovernance of Environment and SustainabilityGlobal PartnershipsClimate Change and International LawClimate, Clean Energy and Carbon Negative TechnologiesBiodiversité: entre science et politiquePolitical Economy of International Energy Global Extraction NetworksEnvironmental History of Latin AmericaIssues in Water Management Agrarian Movements in a Global Perspective, 1800-PresentGlobal Food Systems from a Legal PerspectivePolitical EcologyTransformations agraires

Global health has emerged as a central concern in development and international affairs. The relationship between health and development is at least threefold: health has an intrinsic societal goal, health as a necessary input for human and economic development, and health as an indicator of society's progress toward sustainable development. Health is also a fundamental aspect of international affairs: health is a central component of human security, an outcome of global governance processes in and outside the health sector (e.g. security, trade, investment, migration, environment) in an increasingly interdependent world, and a potential threat to international peace and economic stability.

Studying global health also sheds light on broader aspects of development and international affairs: global health has been a site of growing investment, comprising a tenth of the global economy; social and technological experimentation that has generated innovative approaches to addressing public challenges; and an area filled with a dense network of institutions, states and non-state actors. Although health has traditionally been framed as a medical or technical issue, it is increasingly recognized that protecting global health requires also taking into consideration governance, politics, culture, history, law and economics.

This specialisation track will provide students with an understanding of global health, from the "micro" level of individuals and communities, the "meso" level of countries and organisations, and the "macro" level of the global system. The track will train students to analyze and address global health challenges through courses that explore the historical development of global health, its legal and normative frameworks, the actors and policy processes that govern it, and the social and technological developments that drive it.

 

GRADUATE INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL AND DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

Case postale 1672, 1211 Genève 1T +41 22 908 57 00

©The Graduate Institute, Geneva 2018

 

More Information

Posted on:

Type

Other

Switzerland